Chapter 22 References

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Gelman, Andrew, and Eric Loken. 2014. “The Garden of Forking Paths: Why Multiple Comparisons Can Be a Problem, Even When There Is No ‘Fishing Expedition’ or ‘P-Hacking’ and the Research Hypothesis Was Posited Ahead of Time.” Psychological Bulletin 140 (5): 1272–80. https://doi.org/dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0037714.

Meyer, Michelle N. 2018. “Practical Tips for Ethical Data Sharing.” Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science 1 (1): 131–44. https://doi.org/10.1177/2515245917747656.

Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi. 2020. “No Raw Data, No Science: Another Possible Source of the Reproducibility Crisis.” Molecular Brain 13 (1): 24. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13041-020-0552-2.

Pandey, R. K., and Vinay Tiwari. 2011. “Reliability Issues in Open Source Software.” International Journal of Computer Applications 34 (1): 34–38. https://doi.org/10.5120/4065-5849.

Rouder, Jeffrey N. 2016. “The What, Why, and How of Born-Open Data.” Behavior Research Methods 48 (3): 1062–9. https://doi.org/10.3758/s13428-015-0630-z.

Silberzahn, R., E. L. Uhlmann, D. P. Martin, P. Anselmi, F. Aust, E. Awtrey, Š Bahník, et al. 2018. “Many Analysts, One Data Set: Making Transparent How Variations in Analytic Choices Affect Results:” Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science, August. https://doi.org/10.1177/2515245917747646.